What special precautions should I follow?

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Before taking fluoxetine,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to fluoxetine, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in fluoxetine preparations. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor if you are taking pimozide (Orap), thioridazine, or a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), linezolid (Zyvox), methylene blue, phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), and tranylcypromine (Parnate), or if you have stopped taking a monoamine oxidase inhibitor within the past 2 weeks. Your doctor will probably tell you that you should not take fluoxetine. If you stop taking fluoxetine, you should wait at least 5 weeks before you begin to take thioridazine or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications and vitamins you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: alprazolam (Xanax); amiodarone (Pacerone, Nexterone); certain antibiotics such as erythromycin (E.E.S, Eryc, Ery-tab), gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin (Avelox), and sparfloxacin (no longer available in U.S., Zagam); amphetamines such as amphetamine (in Adderall), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat, in Adderall), and methamphetamine (Desoxyn); anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); antidepressants (mood elevators) such as amitriptyline (Elavil), amoxapine, clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin, imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); buspirone; clopidogrel (Plavix); diazepam (Valium); digoxin (Lanoxin); diuretics (‘water pills’); dolasetron (Anzemet); fentanyl (Duragesic, Lazanda, Subsys, others); flecainide (Tambocor); insulin or oral medications for diabetes; lithium (Lithobid); medications for anxiety and Parkinson’s disease; medications for mental illness such as chlorpromazine, clozapine (Clozaril, Versacloz), droperidol (Inapsine), haloperidol (Haldol), iloperidone (Fanapt), and ziprasidone (Geodon); methadone (Methadose); medications for migraine headaches such as almotriptan (Axert), eletriptan (Relpax), frovatriptan (Frova), naratriptan (Amerge), rizatriptan (Maxalt), sumatriptan (Imitrex), and zolmitriptan (Zomig); pentamidine (Pentam); quinidine (in Nuedexta); procainamide; medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Epitol, Tegretol, Teril) and phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); sedatives; sleeping pills; other selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors such as citalopram (Celexa), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Selfemra), or fluvoxamine (Luvox); serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) medications desvenlafaxine (Khedezla, Pristiq), duloxetine (Cymbalta), levomilnacipran (Fetzima), and venlafaxine; sotalol (Betapace, Sorine); tramadol (Ultram); tranquilizers; and vinblastine (Velban). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor what nutritional supplements and herbal products you are taking, especially products that contain St. John’s wort or tryptophan.
  • tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had a prolonged QT interval (a rare heart problem that may cause irregular heartbeat, fainting, or sudden death). Also tell your doctor if you have a low level of potassium or magnesium in your blood or are being treated with electroshock therapy (procedure in which small electric shocks are administered to the brain to treat certain mental illnesses). Tell your doctor if you have recently had a heart attack and if you have or have ever had heart failure, diabetes, seizures, or liver or heart disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the last few months of your pregnancy, or if you plan to become pregnant or are breastfeeding. If you become pregnant while taking fluoxetine, call your doctor. Fluoxetine may cause problems in newborns following delivery if it is taken during the last months of pregnancy.
  • you should know that fluoxetine may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
  • remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication.
  • you should know that fluoxetine may cause angle-closure glaucoma (a condition where the fluid is suddenly blocked and unable to flow out of the eye causing a quick, severe increase in eye pressure which may lead to a loss of vision). Talk to your doctor about having an eye examination before you start taking this medication. If you have nausea, eye pain, changes in vision, such as seeing colored rings around lights, and swelling or redness in or around the eye, call your doctor or get emergency medical treatment right away.

 

What should I do if I forget a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.